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Lifestyle / Newsletter of 7 Octobre 2019

Minimalism - is less really more?


In today’s ultra-connected world known for its hyper-consumption, one emerging trend is attracting more and more followers every day - minimalism.


In today’s ultra-connected world known for its hyper-consumption, one emerging trend is attracting more and more followers every day - minimalism. A lifestyle philosophy in itself, even a militant movement, minimalism advocates sobriety and functionalism, i.e. getting rid of the superfluous and focussing on the essential instead. In everyday life, this usually means bare interiors, cupboards emptied of all unused objects, even wardrobes stripped down to the bare necessities in an endless quest of quality over quantity. A life decision that may seem ascetic at first, but one that is revered by its followers who claim a feeling of total liberation and happiness.

​Are we rejecting today’s consumer society?

The movement certainly has its leaders, particularly Fumio Sasaki, author of the book Goodbye Things, a global success that was translated into fifteen languages. The book explains minimalism as a reaction to our current society. “We’re living in the age of globalism, where we’re overloaded with materials and information, so the need to reduce and de-clutter is likely to emerge in all countries.

Whether it’s environmental consciousness pushing the use of resources to the limit, concern over savings and reducing expenditure, or simply a way of living in a world that favours experiences and social relations above material possessions, the reasons for the growth in this trend are plentiful. Transitioning from physical ownership to usage facilitated by digital technology, paperless products and content, pooling resources as part of the collaborative economy, etc., are increasingly the practices associated with the lifestyle of the upper classes nowadays. And ones that could be widespread tomorrow? 

Tiny houses, the minimalist way of living

One on-trend way of living appears in the form of tiny houses - movable, ecological and healthy mini-homes that are designed to meet basic needs and limit any wasted space, energy or raw materials. The concept originally came from the United States and could be on the rise in Europe, as evidenced by the recent call for tender launched by the municipality of Rezé in France, in the Nantes region, to create a village of these tiny houses locally. The city will provide 6,700 m² of land to owners for this type of housing, provided they’re built in groups of three to six homes and meet all the necessary conditions set by building regulations.

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